Should ESL Executives Focus on Mastering the Written Language or the Spoken Language?

There are two English languages; the spoken language and the written language.  Broken English happens when the speaker does not understand the difference between the two.  In many other languages, one symbol equals one sound, hence the spoken and written languages are one.  This is not the case with English.  There are 26 letters in the alphabet, but there are 44 sounds in well spoken English.  One letter in English can have many sounds, and one sound in English has no letter equivalent at all.

But because many foreigners assume that the written and spoken languages are essentially the same, that the English language is phonetic, they assume that if they master the written language, they will be mastering the spoken language as well.  Because English is not a phonetic language, it is essential that students understand that the spoken and written languages are largely distinct, and learn their separate rules and logic.  Over time, the vague connection between the two can be gleaned.

What happens to your English if you don’t understand that the “o” symbol can be pronounced many different ways? “Hot” sounds like “hope”.  “Pot” sounds like “Pope”.  And on and on.  Mispronunciation becomes common because the speaker is pronouncing the 26 letters of the alphabet, rather than the 44 sounds of English.  To avoid this, it’s important to be sure to learn the spoken language concurrently with the written language, and with the same vigor.

Understanding the difference between the spoken and written language is only half the battle.  If you want to speak English excellently, you must fight against a larger, more insidious force than this basic misconception.  Do you know what it is?  Your Iphone.  Unfortunately, we live in a society that prizes the written language to the detriment of the spoken language.  How many of your friends prize public speaking, and can’t stand dawdling on their Iphones? None? Yea me too.  Since Guttenberg’s time, we have canonized writing, and eschewed speaking.  To win the battle of better English, you have to resist the pull of the written word, on your computer screen, Iphone, tablet, TV, ect, and begin to open your ears to the sounds of English.

Three Big Mistakes ESL Executives Make with their Presentations

Three Big Mistakes ESL Executives Make with their Presentations Click To Tweet

I really identify with the struggle ESL executives face when putting together a speech.  It’s difficult to give a solid presentation without struggling with the language, let alone trying to manage phrasing and articulation while presenting.  That’s a lot to juggle.  During my years as a speech coach in New York City and New Jersey I’ve seen a lot of ESL executives give a lot of different types of speeches.  Here are three mistakes I see most often:

  1. Focusing too much on the articulation of individual sounds, and not enough on the musicality of the language – It’s important to circle trouble words within your speech outline, and work on their pronunciation, but it’s equally important to make sure you circle the focus words within a phrase, and lift your intonation on them.  The rhythm and intonation patterns of the language are more important to master than individual sounds.
  2. Going too fast! – If you are an ESL executive, here is the best piece of advice I can give you about presenting… YOU CANNOT SPEAK TOO SLOW!  I know, I know, you feel like you are boring the room.  But would you rather take the risk of being a little too boring, or not being understood?  Pausing is powerful.  Take your time. Focus on your articulation.
  3. Using complex words when simple ones will do – I recently had an executive who was giving a major speech at a conference and he was throwing out a number of four and five syllable words like “instrumentation”.  Naturally, he was stumbling quite a bit.  There’s no need to use complex words, in fact the worlds greatest speakers (including Winston Churchill) generally advocated using simple words while presenting.If you want to make improvement on your articulation, join me for an upcoming online accent reduction course.

What Should Obama Be Speaking About and to Whom?

What Should Obama Be Speaking About and to Whom? Click To TweetBarack Obama will be giving a speech on healthcare to Wall Street investment banking firm Cantor Fitzgerald, and the internet is up in arms about it.  Apparently, he will be pocketing a hefty $400,000 speaker fee, which is the source of much of the internet’s consternation.  While this fee pales in comparison to the $153 million the Clintons made on speaking fees after Bill’s presidency, it does bring up some thorny ethical questions.  Not the least being, what should ex-president’s be speaking about, and to whom?

A comparison might be made to Winston Churchill’s “Iron Curtain” speech delivered at Westminster College in Fulton Missouri in 1946, in the midst of the Cold War.  Churchill had recently lost a re-election bid for Prime Minister, and was on the speaker circuit, much as Obama is.  Churchill used the occasion to send out a warning regarding Stalin’s expansionistic tendencies in Europe, and to try to strengthen the bond between America and Britain.  Churchill spoke to students and addressed his comments to the American public.  His speech foreshadowed decades of American foreign policy.

Nowadays, world leaders view speaking opportunities as a means to fast cash, and forget the tremendous power they wield to forge policy, and change hearts and minds.  Would Churchill have spoken to titans of industry at a crucial moment in world history?  And are we not in a similar moment (rising healthcare costs, immigration reform, a resurgent and dangerous Russia, etc, etc)?

Obama has a right to make some money post-presidency, but the world will lack for his ideas when it desperately needs them if he chooses to address his comments in private.  At this defining moment of history, we need politicians to address the concerns of our time to future leaders, and to the American public, much the way Churchill did over seventy years ago.