“A Star Is Born” and Speaking Bravely

I recently saw “A Star Is Born” with my wife on a rare night out (we have two young children).  It was a fantastic movie and a must-see for anyone who loves performing and presenting.

The film is about a washed-up rocker (Jackson) who falls for a young, poor, talented singer (Ally), and gives her the courage to find her voice,   I think the film offers a lot of wisdom in regard to speaking in public.  Ally is searching for stardom but doesn’t truly find it until she follows Jackson’s advice, and sings from the deepest parts of her soul.  Only when she makes her singing deeply personal does she truly “have something to say” (in Jackson’s parlance).

Do you personalize your speeches?  Do you plum the depths to find material that is secret, provocative, honest?  Do you tell stories?  Do you work to relate to your audience, to share your humanity, with all of its messiness?  Or do you neaten things up to make yourself look “good”?

Brave public speaking, like brave singing, happens rarely.  But when it does, it unites, it inspires, it transforms.  Think today about your speeches, and ask yourself “Am I being brave?”.

What We Can Learn From Comedians About Pacing

I think John Mulaney is one of the best comedians around these days.  What can we learn from him from a public speaking perspective?  Here are three things I think we can take away:

  1. His pacing is very deliberate – Notice the tempo at which Mr. Mulaney speaks.  It’s very measured, but it never feels belabored.  That’s because he is using his tempo to create vocal variety, emphasizing certain words with volume and pitch.
  2. He makes eye contact with his audience –  Pretty straightforward, right?  If you want to create a relationship with the audience, you need to look at them.
  3. He has clearly rehearsed – It’s never a good idea to wing a presentation, but we don’t want to sound too canned either.  It’s often best to rehearse from a set of simple bullet points and allow yourself to improvise within that structure.  Mr. Mullaney clearly has a few “bits” he is working with, but he doesn’t sound like he has thought out each word he is going to say.  He stays loose with his execution.

How Managers Can Assess an Employee’s Need for Speech Coaching

Certain public speaking problems can be solved in a solitary fashion.  If you are unhappy with your powerpoint design, pick up Presentation Zen by Garr Reynolds.  If you occasionally stumble over words, watch this blog post, and use a metronome to slow down your speech.  If you feel scattered while presenting, write out a set of short bullet points, and stick to them!  But there are certain public speaking problems they may require a collaborative approach.  Here are some public speaking problems that require coaching:

  1. Panic – if your employee is badly stumbling over their words, or unable to get through their presentations, that is a surefire sign that they need coaching.  A coach can teach them to breathe properly and to prepare themselves mentally before they present.
  2. Very Low Volume – if you are asking your employee to speak up on a regular basis, it may be that they need voice coaching.  A coach can help them breathe from their diaphragm, and utilize chest and face resonance to enhance their voice.
  3. Very Thick Accent – If your employee is unable to pronounce core business words, well, yea you guessed it…they definitely need coaching!  A coach can help them articulate vowel and consonant sounds, and rehearse the words they are using at work.

A good coach usually starts with a thorough evaluation and then draws up a personalized, practical lesson plan.  Be sure the coach you work with is assigning homework, and accessing progress as well.